Locations

Dramatic Need works with schools in two parts of the Republic of South Africa, the North West Province and the Free State. We partner with a host of schools, some of which you can find out more about below.

 

 

THE NORTH WEST PROVINCE

The North West Province has the lowest number of South Africans aged 20 years and older (5,9%), who have received higher education1. An estimated 65% of the population of the North West Province live in rural areas and the adult literacy rate is in the region of 57%.

 

 

SESOBE VILLAGE
RUSTENBURG'S SURROUNDING SQUATTER CAMPS
 

Home to Baphalane and Barokologadi ba Ga Maotwa Tswana Tribes who settled here after the forced evictions during the Apartheid era, Sesobe has a current population of approximately 2,000 people. The village consists of a gas station (no unleaded available), two bars (open sporadically), a sundries store and a nunnery. HIV/AIDS has devastated this small village and education standards remain very poor.

 

Dramatic Need works in three schools in Sesobe:

  • Naledi Ya Masa Primary, serves grades R-6

      (ages 5-11) and has 130 students.

  • Rachele Intermediate School, which serves grades 7-9 (ages 11-14), and has 149 students.

  • Sesobe Crèche, 36 children ages 2-5.See two of our volunteers in Sesobe

 

PHOKENG

St. Catherine’s Primary School, 312 students, ages 5-12.

The squatter camps around Phokeng and Rustenburg consist primarily of migrant populations, namely Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho, Setwana and Tsitsonga (Zimbabwean) people who come to the North West Province in search of work in the local mining industry. Too many people for too few jobs, combined with the long distances travelled by the migrants, mean that many are forced to set up a base wherever they can. This has lead to a spiralling number of squatter camps in the Phokeng area. The difference between a camp and a township is that the South African government does not acknowledge the former as a permanent or legal settlement. Squatter camps therefore, have no utilities or basic services; no running water, sewerage systems, health care facilities, electricity or postal service.

Read more about these camps on our blog>

 

There are no government schools in squatter camps, only crèches set up by local community and church groups. Children above the age of 5 are not eligible for any schooling within the squatter camp and thus there is an exceptionally high number of illiterate youth and adults.Dramatic Need works in the following learning centres in the North West Province squatter camps:

Siza Squatter Camp:

Rise & Shine Crèche has 17 students and the children are aged 1 – 5 years.

 

Nkaneng Squatter Camp:

  • Lukhanyo Early Learning Centre, 22 students, aged 1- 5.

  • Masizakhe Early Learning Centre, (crèche and Grade R-1st school year, children aged 5&6). 26 students in the crèche and 15 students at Grade R.Masizakhe Adult Learning Centre for Skills Building & Literacy: part of the

  • Masizakhe complex, there are 12-14 adult women in skills building, and 14 men and women in literacy.

 

Freedom Park Squatter Camp

OVC Centre (Orphans & Vulnerable Children) under the umbrella of Tapologo: The Tapologo Afternoon Programme has just 30 active students out of 250+/- who are registered. Dramatic Need is trying to encourage more children to attend.

 

Boitekong Squatter Camp 

Kopanang Daycare for Handicapped Young Adults, Crèche & Skills Training for Adults and young adults, 14 students.

 

 

FREE STATE

The Free State, formally the Orange Free State, and briefly an independent Afrikaner Republic, has the third highest rate of HIV infection in South Africa with 31.1 % of pregnant women infected.2 Some 16% of people aged 20 years or older have had no schooling. The official unemployment rate according to Statistics South Africa is 23,3%.3

 

 VILJOENSKROOM

 

Dramatic Need works in some of the more remote farm schools in the region and it is here that the charity intends to build the Pete Patsa Community Arts Centre so as to provide a base for learning with reliable transport links

 

  • Huntersvlei Primary is a farm school split across two locations, it serves grades R-7, and has approximately 500 students. It is occasionally is served by less than two teachers at a time. All Dramatic Need volunteers sent to the Free State teach in this school.

 

  • Sussex Primary is also a farm school and serves Grades 1- 6. Sussex has 27 students. Evergreen Primary School (farm school). Evergreen is next door to the site where the Pete Patsa Arts Centrewill be built. Evergreen caters for Grades 1-6 and has 120 students.

 

  • Leoka Primary (farm school) Grades 1-6, with 11 students. One of the more remote farm schools Dramatic Need works with.

is a small maize and stud cattle-farming town two and a half hours south of Johannesburg in the northern Free State. Many children live on distant farms, tens of miles apart, and walk up to two hours to school in the morning. 

 

 

RAMMULOTSI

 

Rammulotsi is the ‘satellite’ township adjacent to the town Viljoenskroon, and has a population of approximately 120,000 (mainly) Sesotho speakers. Its population struggles with extremely high HIV rates, high unemployment, high incidence of alcohol, drug and sexual abuse and poor education facilities.

 

Dramatic Need works in two schools in Rammulotsi:Thabang Secondary School: Grades 7-12 (ages 13- 18 years), approximately 950 students.Nstoanotsatsi Primary: Grades R-6, (ages 5-12), approximately 1400 students

 

Dramatic Need works in the Rwamagana District, in the Eastern Province, Rwanda.

  • Apaperwa Primary school, 452 students in primary education and 102 in nursery education.

  • Excel Bilingual Primary School, 346 students

  • Espoir Primary School, 243 students

RWANDA

 

Since the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, during which approximately 800,000 people were brutally murdered, Rwanda has experienced a period of relative peace and development. It is the safest country in East Africa and is meeting a number of targets of the Millenium Development Goals. However, the impact of the genocide is still being felt by young Rwandans. Sexual and physical abuse, ethnic tensions, HIV/AIDS and severe poverty remain significant problems, as does the widespread impunity of genocide perpetrators.

Since the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, during which approximately 800,000 people were brutally murdered, Rwanda has experienced a period of relative peace and development.

 

It is the safest country in East Africa and is meeting a number of targets of the Millenium Development Goals. However, the impact of the genocide is still being felt by young Rwandans. Sexual and physical abuse, ethnic tensions, HIV/AIDS and severe poverty remain significant problems, as does the widespread impunity of genocide perpetrators.

 

The use of theatre and other forms of artistic expression has long been recognised as a powerful and accessible way to raise awareness and address difficult subjects such as gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS. It gives boys and girls the confidence to confront their emotional barriers and advocate for their equal rights. 

 

 

 

RWAMAGANA DISCRICT

Dramatic Need hopes that through the use of theatre, music and the arts we can play a small, but important role in long-term Rwandan reconciliation and prevent future conflicts by teaching young people to express themselves and embrace difference. 

 

Dramatic Need works in the Rwamagana District, in the Eastern Province, Rwanda.

 

  • Apaperwa Primary school, 452 students in primary education and 102 in nursery education.

  • Excel Bilingual Primary School, 346 students

  • Espoir Primary School, 243 students

 

Contact Us

For general enquiries, contact:

info@dramaticneed.org

 

England and Wales Charity Number: 1119443

England and Wales Company Number: 06051122

 

South Africa Non-Profit Company Number: 2017/212994/08

USA 501(c)(3) Foundation Number: 82-1037862

 

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All content © 2006 - 2019 by Dramatic Need. All rights reserved.

 

Dramatic Need is a registered charity and company in England and Wales, numbers 1119443 and 06051122 respectively; a registered non-profit company in South Africa, number 2017/212994/08; and a registered 501(c)(3) foundation in the USA, number 82-1037862 

 

Official Patron: Her Excellency, Dr. Lindiwe Mabuza, former South African High Commissioner to the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland.

 

Board of Trustees UK and South Africa: Ms. Clemency Burton-Hill,  Ms. Vanessa Garwood, Mr. Phil Drew, Mr. Simon Oakes, Ms. Amanda Lambert, 

Mr Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, Mr. Michael Sackler, Mr Conrad Kemp. 

Board of Trustees USA: Ms. Aubrey Henderson Siegel, Ms. Amanda Lambert, Ms Holly Noland Dunlap.